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Cleveland Nursing Home Abuse Lawsuit

As a largely rural state, Ohio has seen its share of growing elderly populations that live in low-income areas with very few federally funded facilities to rely on. It is estimated that of those who do live in nursing facilities, one in ten experience elder abuse. In Cleveland nursing homes, some of these cases are still being documented today.

Elder Justice Initiative

In 2014, Ohio state government leaders set up new measures to help address some of the problems faced by elderly citizens, particularly those who live in rural areas. The Elder Justice Initiative began with a one-time allotment of ten million dollars to funnel into the quality of the state-run healthcare facilities. Additionally, up to another eight million dollars would be added to the measure over the next year.

The measure also increased the amount of education and training needed for professionals to qualify to work with the elderly, and it made efforts to encourage more research into the proper care of a quickly-aging community.

While advocates claim that the measure is not enough to do the majority of nursing home residents any good, the government leaders claim that this is a step in the right direction. With reporting statistics improving, cases like the two sexual abuse cases involving elderly Cleveland citizens at nursing homes in the last two years are becoming less common. Additionally, cases like the 2012 case of a nurse’s aide throwing a patient into bed, resulting in a 10.5-year sentence, are also being reduced.

Adult Protective Services in Cleveland

When an elderly resident of a Cleveland nursing home experiences abuse, or a family member or friend suspects that they are being abused, one of the first authorities to call is the Cleveland Adult Protective Services. This agency is responsible for investigating all crimes related to elder abuse that does not involve Medicaid or Medicare.

When you call the APS, the first thing that happens after a caseworker is assigned is they will come for an in-person visit. If there is an immediate danger to the life or well-being of the elderly person, the APS will assist the elderly citizen in finding temporary lodgings.

Legal action may be taken if other solutions, such as a satisfactory policy change on the part of the nursing facility, do not fix the problem. The Elder Abuse Hotline for Cleveland nursing homes is 216-420-6700.

Department of Aging

In the last two years, Cleveland has been recognized as an ‘age friendly’ city by the World Health Organization’s Global Network of Age-Friendly Cities. The AARP also includes Cleveland in its list of senior-friendly cities.

Thanks in part to the Elder Justice Initiative, Cleveland now has a multi-step improvement plan in place that is helping to create a safer and happier city overall for the elderly residents living in nursing homes. While the Department of Aging is not the first place to turn when a case of suspected elder abuse needs to be investigated, they can help provide information about the laws that govern nursing facilities and elder care in Cleveland. Their number is 216-664-2218, and they are located in Cleveland, Ohio.

Services that the Department of Aging provide include senior centers, nutrition programs, legal and financial advice, some crisis intervention, employment assistance, transportation, and help understanding the many health and wellness programs that are available. They may also be able to help with dementia needs, disability needs, condition management, and equipment provision. If a nursing home or long-term care facility is required, the Department of Aging can help you and your family understand which homes have the best ratings for your care.

 

Sources:

http://www.city.cleveland.oh.us/CityofCleveland/Home/Government/CityAgencies/Aging/AgingAndDisabilityResourceCenter

 

http://dsas.cuyahogacounty.us/en-US/adult-protective-services.aspx

 

http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2016/01/09/public-can-act-to-stem-elder-abuse-report-says.html

 

http://www.cleveland.com/open/index.ssf/2014/05/ohio_attorney_general_announce_1.html

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