Nursing Home Abuse in Vermont

Vermont Nursing Home Laws and Regulations

It’s unfortunate that this is even an issue. However, nursing home abuse and neglect has been occurring for many years and in many different forms. Thousands of patients are physically or emotionally abused, exploited for their money or property, or just completely neglected. And, this happens all too often. In an attempt to combat this, the federal government has put together country-wide laws and regulations designed to protect patients in nursing homes. Additionally, each state can create their own rules as well. The Vermont nursing home laws and regulations cover several different areas that the state chose to expand on federal statutes.

If you have a loved one who is in a nursing facility or assisted living home, then you need to be familiar with Vermont nursing home laws and regulations. That’s because, if any laws are being broken, and your loved one is being abused, exploited or neglected, you need to know that they have legal recourse.

The Individual Laws

As mentioned, there are certain Vermont nursing home laws and regulations designed to protect your loved one. There is much more to these laws than we could possibly list here, so if you would like to read the full extent of them, you can visit Vermont Adult Protective Services at www.dlp.vermont.gov/protection. You will find a variety of different resources at this website.

Vermont does have a set of residents’ rights as a part of the Vermont nursing home laws and regulations. These rights are always readily available to you online and through the nursing home. They include:

  • Patients have the right to be treated with respect and dignity.
  • Patients have the right to make a complaint without fear of punishment.
  • Patients have the right to communicate as they choose.
  • Patients have the right to refuse visitors.
  • Patients have the right to receive care without abuse.
  • They have the right to be free from physical or medical restraints at all times except when necessary to prevent injury.
  • They have the right to keep their personal belongings within reason.
  • They have the right to vote.
  • Patients have the right to participate in events and activities.
  • Patients have the right to remain in their room unless they have been transferred or discharged from the facility.
  • The patient has the right to participate in religious activities.
  • The patient has the right to return to the nursing home in the wake of a hospital stay.
  • Patients have the right to receive help from Medicaid in order to pay for care.
  • Patients have the right to stay in the facility unless it adversely affects wellbeing of other residents, it can no longer provide care needed, the bill has not been paid, the facility is closing, or court has required a transfer.
  • They have the right to privacy.
  • They have the right to send and receive mail without monitoring.
  • They have the right to refuse care or treatment as long as it is permitted by law.
  • They have the right to know the services offered by the facility.

This is only the beginning of the Vermont nursing home laws and regulations, which are quite extensive.

Reporting Abuse

If you believe your loved one is being abused or neglected by a nursing home, then Vermont nursing home laws and regulations are in place to help. You can report the concern by calling 800-564-1612 or by using an online form at this link. You may also wish to contact an attorney so that they can better look after the rights and care of your loved one. Abuse in nursing homes will not be tolerated in Vermont, so be sure you understand these laws.

Resources:

http://nursinghomeabuseguide.com/nursing-home-laws/northeast/

http://www.dlp.vermont.gov/protection

http://www.dlp.vermont.gov/abuse-reporting-form/abuse-reporting-form-1

 

 

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